"Talented" Ti-Plant (Cordyline terminalis)

Red and Green Ti1.jpg
hawaiian ti plant.jpg
Green Ti2.jpg
Red and Green Ti1.jpg
hawaiian ti plant.jpg
Green Ti2.jpg

"Talented" Ti-Plant (Cordyline terminalis)

from 5.99

Hawaii's versatile plant, then and now

You may not realize just how often you have seen the leaves of the ti plant in your Hawaiian experience, but trust us it's there. For instance, many restaurants use a portion of a green ti leaf as a fine decorative touch when plating their specials (Eating it won't hurt you, but it's got no taste). In a cool way, it's a subtle nod to how the ancient Hawaiians used the ti leaf as a plate. Watch a hula competition and you're bound to see the green ti leaves show up as skirts. Ancient Hawaiians used them for roofing material, raincoats, whistles and sandals. In fact, you'll see a lot of ti in the landscaping around your hotel, or simply growing wild in and around our yards. And if that weren't enough, distilling the root of the ti plant can give you a form of brandy savored by ancient (as well as the not so ancient) Hawaiians!  (It's called 'okole hao' and was even given honorable mention in an episode of 'Hawaii-Five-O'. Want to try some? Click here). 

Good luck plant?

It's not our thing, but some people will also tout the ti plant's luck bringing abilities.

Yeah, whatever. 

The truth of the matter is that the ti plant is a large part of Hawaiian life, so it makes sense that in order to properly remember your Hawaiian time, you'll need some ti in your life too. 

Red & Green

There are two types of leaves - red and green. Most of us in Hawaii use the green leaves the most. However, a lot of visitors seem to go for the red color. Regardless of your preference, we sell both. And we sell both colors in two versions: (1) A growing plant and (2) as a cutting. 

Get ready to go native and get some ti plant. Order now.

Remember: Order directly from the source. And, as always, your satisfaction is guaranteed! 

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How to grow the Hawaiian Ti log 

From a cutting:

Scrape off the wax from both ends of the log and position each log HORIZONTALLY - that is, you lay it on its side - (don't laugh, it's one of the most common questions we receive) in the potting soil. When you do this, bury the log down about 1/4 of the way, leaving the rest above the level of the soil. Keep it moist and in a partially shaded location until roots and leaves are produced.  Gradually move it into full sun.  Water daily, and if conditions are dry, water it morning and evening.  If the climate is too hot (above 85℉), the Ti will do better in partial shade.  If it variegated ti (the red-leaf variety), be careful because it will burn easily in open hot sun. Also, know that temperatures below 60℉ is a no, no!  A general garden fertilizer when used according to the instructions will do the job well, and the Ti should respond nicely.